Visiting Scholar Program

Phi Beta Kappa Visiting Scholar: Philip Kitcher

Thursday, March 9, 2017 to Friday, March 10, 2017
Philip Kitcher is John Dewey Professor of Philosophy at Columbia. His books include Living with Darwin (Lannan Foundation Notable Book Award); Science in a Democratic Society; The Ethical Project; Preludes to Pragmatism; Deaths in Venice: The Cases of Gustav von Aschenbach; and Life After Faith. A new book on climate change, The Seasons Alter: How to Save our Planet in Six Acts, co-authored with Evelyn Fox Keller, will be published by W.W. Norton in April 2017.
 
Past president of the American Philosophical Association Pacific Division and a former editor-in-chief of Philosophy of Science, he was the first recipient of the APA’s Prometheus Prize in recognition of his “contribution to expanding the frontiers of research in philosophy and science.” He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and has been honored by Columbia with its Lenfest Distinguished Faculty Award and a Distinguished Service to the Columbia College Core Curriculum Award. He has been a Fellow at the Wissenschaftskolleg zu Berlin, and, in the Fall of 2015, was the Daimler Fellow at the American Academy in Berlin. He received the Romanell-Phi Beta Kappa Professorship in Philosophy in 2003-2004.
 
March 9, 11 am – 12:15 pm. McKenna Theater (Creative Arts Building) - CA 129. Free.
March 9, 6 – 8pm. Humanities Symposium Room (Humanities Building) - HUM 587. Free.
 
The Phi Beta Kappa visiting scholar program events are supported by the Provost Office, the College of Liberal and Creative Arts, and the Philosophy Department.
 
Contact: 
Masahiko Minami
E-mail: 
Phone: 
415-338-7451

 

Public Events Schedule

  • March 9, 11 am – 12:15 pm, Philosophy of Risk (PHIL 351) McKenna Theater - CA 129 (public event). Prof Kitcher will talk about ethical obligations in regard to experimentation on animals (the discussion also includes risks vs. benefits of genetic manipulation).
  • March 9, 6 – 8 pm, Humanities Building, Room 587: Bay Area Philosophy of Science (BAPS) Working Group (public event). Debates concerning what to do about climate change – and whether to do anything at all – turn on six major questions.